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Counselling and Support

  1. Staff Qualifications
  2. Individualised counselling and support
  3. Therapeutic Practice
  4. Cultural competence
  5. Charter of rights
  6. Making a complaint

 

1. Staff Qualifications
Counselling and support is provided at Phoenix House by tertiary qualified staff, who hold masters and bachelor degrees in psychology, social work, counselling and teaching.

2. Individualised counselling and support
Phoenix House does not provide a ‘cook-book’ response to people whose lives have been impacted by sexual violence. Each child, young person and adult who seeks counselling and support from the organisation is treated as an individual, and following a period of assessment an individual plan is developed with them to allow them to heal from the impact of sexual violence.

3. Therapeutic Practice
Counselling staff are trained in a number of models which provide people accessing the service with a range of therapies to choose from. For example, these include play therapy, sand therapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, trauma-focussed cognitive therapy, narrative therapy, psycho-education, EMDR ( Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing) and hypnotherapy. Both individual counselling and group work is available.

4. Cultural competence
All staff at Phoenix House receive ongoing training in cultural competence. The organisation employs an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Support Worker, who works within the main service and the Bumblebees Therapeutic Preschool; her role includes facilitating access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Families and individuals, and ensuring Phoenix House remains a culturally safe working environment. The organisation also employs multi-lingual staff, and provides access to interpreters as required.


5. Charter of rights
When you access Phoenix House you have the right to:

  1. Have your individual human worth and dignity respected.
  2. Confidentiality and privacy.
  3. Be treated with respect and courtesy.
  4. Have choices over, and to make decisions about, the services you receive here.
  5. Be referred to other Services as appropriate.
  6. Pursue any complaint about service provision without your counselling being affected.
  7. An advocate of your choice.

You can assist with your counselling, support and advocacy by:

  1. Respecting the human dignity and worth of the service providers and others.
  2. Being aware that there are demands and limitations on staff of service providers.
  3. Helping the staff of service providers by communicating your needs with courtesy.
  4. Providing appropriate information relevant to your counselling.
  5. Taking responsibility for the decisions you make and their results, and
  6. Ensuring your complaints follow appropriate procedures.

 

6. Making a complaint
Phoenix House is committed to providing a high quality service to all children, young people, adults and families as outlined in ‘Your Charter of Rights’.

If you find that your rights are not being respected, or you have any other form of complaint regarding Phoenix House or its’ staff, you are encouraged to make a formal complaint about the matter.
This can be achieved by taking the following steps:

  1. If the complaint is regarding a Counsellor or the Administrative Worker, you  should ask to discuss the matter with the Service Director.
  2. If the complaint is regarding the Service Director, you should ask to discuss the matter with a member of the Management Committee.
  3. If you are not satisfied with the outcome of the initial meeting a further meeting will be arranged for you to talk to the Director and a member of the Management Committee.
  4. If following this meeting you do not achieve satisfaction, you can be referred to the most appropriate agency with whom to take up your complaint. This might be: The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission or The Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services.
  5. You are encouraged to bring a support person, if required, when making a complaint.
  6. Making a complaint will not affect your rights in any way.